Pitbull dog attack – How to search Google the right way

A pitbull dog attack just happened and you didn’t even know? Learn how to find them.

Most of us are always flabbergasted when we come to know later on, if so, of a pitbull dog attack, or from any other dangerous dog, that happened in an area very close to us, like our neighborhood, community or city.

One way to know what is going on, specially about serious events that can affect our safety and well being, is to learn “how to be informed” on them.

You can do that, easily and for free, by using Google. Just watch the video and you will see how.

Basically speaking, just search by using the News section, not the Web one. Just type in your keywords, like “pitbull dog attack,” and look for the results.

A pitbull dog attack is constantly under-reported

You will find that the number of pitbull dog attacks are much, much greater then you what you heard from the mainstream media.

Many news organizations do not want to lose advertisers in the pet industry lobby, regardless if the dogs are regular or dangerous ones.

So, never think that what you saw on your local TV news channel is all that happened in your area.

Expand your search into other dogs bitings, killings, maulings…

You may alternatively search for ANY DOG attacks, dog bite, dog killed, and dog mauls.. as the breed is left out of the news article 99 percent of the time.

More than 99% of dogs attacks with overly serious and even fatal consequences were mostly done by pit bulls but news reporter just said it was “dog”.

As said above, you may add any specifics you want:

  • Your community
  • Your city
  • Your state
  • Your country
  • Other languages
  • A specific year or period of time
  • A dog breed other than pit bulls (remember: all dogs can bite, all dogs can attack, not just pit bulls).

Just use your creativity and focus on what you really want to find.

Be alerted on a pitbull dog attack in almost real time

Stay up to date on these results by creating an email alert for any keyword you want, like “dog attack” or “pitbull killing”.

Just look at the bottom of the page and click on the “Create an email alert for…” blue link. It’s pretty straightforward from there.

What to do after learning of a pitbull dog attack event?

You can, as a minimum, get involved in your community raising safety standards to prevent dog attacks and other problems caused by dogs. There are plenty of opportunities.

Learn more on What You Can Do.

Resources:

Google News
Wikipedia – Pit bull dog attack

Category: NO Dogs, Please! | 10 comments

  • nicholas scatuorchio says:

    Im sure you wont publish this, but it does show me that you are the POS i thought you were. I have many friends in media. Pitbull attacks are top priority when they happen due to the attention those stories get. Get a clue jackass. FYVM Rottie Guy.

    • MrMAD says:

      “I have many friends in media.”

      That’s exactly the point here.

      You, dangerous pit bulldogs fanatics, DO HAVE friends in the media, a lot of them, btw.

      The word ‘friends’, however, is definitely not appropriate as it should be described as ‘business partners’. Your befriended ‘reporters’ almost only cover an incident (not accident) because they HAVE to since their competitors are as well, even though superficially. Furthermore, your ‘friends’ almost always show the case as a tragedy only when the beast is killed, but when a person is murdered or torn apart in pieces they make it seem just another regular day in town. Also, they only keep on covering that when it get to a wider exposure, like to state or federal level. And then there are the ‘editors’ of such ‘news organizations’ (pitbull dog propaganda machines, I’d say) who carefully manipulate the wording of each report. I’m sure many of those editors are your “friends in media.” as well.

      This practice is absolutely unacceptable.

      Lucid and enlightened persons can clearly see what is what but the millions that have been brainwashed by Dancing With the Stars, CNN, Fox and all the dog propaganda in movies and on TV programs and commercials, well, those people not so much. They are just little pawns that gullible individuals love to pray on. And profit fortunes.

      I still have to find irrefutable proof of hard and cold money exchanging hands among insane dog lovers and utterly unprofessional media members.

      Why I haven’t found that? Because I haven’t researched, yet.

       

      (I hope you don’t become the next Grandma Linda)

      • nicholas scatuorchio says:

        Not at all. I am pack leader. As much as you dont want to believe it, i am the MAN in the rescue world. I’ve had bad experiences. The owner/handler is responsible. A dog is what a person makes of it. Unnecessary barking is unacceptable. Outright aggression is unacceptable. Both can be corrected by a responsible dog owner. I really hope one day you realize the shithead irresponsible dog owners are to blame. Not the dog.

        • MrMAD says:

          Incorrect >>> “Unnecessary barking is unacceptable. Outright aggression is unacceptable. “

          Correct >>> ANY barking is unacceptable. ANY aggression is unacceptable.

          I said before: no more attacks. I don’t care how good or who you think you are. I have no time for this kind of nonsense. This was the last warning.

  • tg says:

    MrMad, I’m not trying to argue but I think I’d make an exception for a warning bark or two. I mean, if a responsible dog owner is being alerted to an attack by a vicious dog or person. Then I could forgive their dog barking for alerting them. I think service dogs bark to alert their owners to danger, and I’m saying I could see allowing that for pet dogs as well. On aggressive behavior we agree, it’s never to be tolerated.

    • MrMAD says:

      You’re welcome, TG.

      You have a well reasoned and intelligent point of view and this is highly appreciated here.

      Like you, I am NOT against a *real* warning bark or two.

      The problem is this: when we start allowing that, regular dog owners think they can let their dogs bark for *another* couple of extra barks. Then, for more 5 minutes, 10 minutes, half an hour, one hour, two hours, half a day, a full night, and so on. First, the dogs bark because of a new dog entered their house, then bark because a kid is walking on the sidewalk, then bark because a squirrel is on a tree across the street, or because the wind is blowing.

      We’ve *already* experienced that.

      Regular dog owners, the absolute majority these days, do Not have a normal perception of limits or boundaries. So, when we kindly say OK to a warning bark or two, because we know accidents happen, they will Not be content with that, owners then think their dogs are special (and so make them special too) and the barking problem will only escalate. That is exactly what we face today.

      Barking is Not the only hazard, btw. We are nowadays constantly bombarded by:
      - dogs at large (just one escape was not bad, but now…);
      - dogs defecating on sidewalks public (just one exception was not bad, but now…);
      - dogs defecating on non-dog people private property (just one accident was not bad, but now…);
      - dogs biting (just one accident was not intolerable, but now…);
      - dogs attacking people, kids, elderly, animals (completely unacceptable, but now…);
      - dogs mauling, maiming, disfiguring people (completely unacceptable, but now…);
      - dogs *killing* people (completely unacceptable but continues to happen in an astonishingly rate!).

      We, non-dog people, were too kind with doggists and that was THE problem. Now they think they have the *right* to behave that way, anywhere and everywhere, still portraying *us* as the bad guys. Worst, even throwing the law book on us like if *we* were the criminals!

      Well, I could go on and on but to summarize: we have to be very, very strict with them — at least for some time until when they hopefully become responsible, *fully* responsible — if we want to take our peace and quiet back. Making concessions and compromising at this point in time will Not help us, simply because they do not understand that. At all.

  • tg says:

    MrMad, I really can promise you when I get a dog none of the annoying behaviors will be tolerated. I will walk my dog, and do my best to keep it from defecating on private property, or in places like parks where kids play. If it does happen, I promise to clean it up immediately. My dog will be taught to bark only to warn of danger. It will not get off leash, it will be friendly and safe with all people. It will not be a danger to other animals (that’s aggression as well). It won’t be a biter, and I don’t want a puppy because they chew on everything. I want a normal, well behaved dog. The kind that doesn’t nuisance bark, and when being walked, or people come over, is friendly without getting in your face. One that is taught not to bed while we’re eating, but might get leftovers as a treat, if it leaves us alone. One that knows walks are for exercise, that going potty should only happen in our own yard, where I can clean it up. Those were the dogs my parents had, and the type of dog my daughter has. It’s also the type my niece has, and he was abused before she got him. It takes time, patience and love to train them properly, but I know it can be done. You have seen my posts on bully breeds, I agree that they are dangerous. Of course, they don’t usually bark before attacking, making them more dangerous. At least I know if a dog’s barking, keeping it away from myself and my son is in our best interest. My parents loved small dogs, usually called ankle biters, by most people, None of them bit, none of them barked more than twice to alert us to something. I’m not a fan of yappers, as I generally like a quiet life. It’s like the car stereos, the police won’t do anything about. I wish I could disable them when I’m trying to talk to somebody, watch tv, or sleep and they come by and rattle our windows.

    • MrMAD says:

      Nothing against you being a fully responsible dog owner, TG.

      I just have one question: Why do you still have a desire to have a dog, specially with *all* described in this this blog?

      (no, nobody will convince me to get one, I just want to understand it)

  • tg says:

    I still want one because we always had them growing up. I like dogs, and miss having one. I grew up with many different kinds around me, and they can be great companions. Pets in general are good for teaching kids some responsibility. Since dogs show affection, the reward is obvious to kids. I like the company of a well trained dog, and having done that before know it’s not impossible. The hard part will be finding a dog who can still protect itself if a bully attacks, because I don’t want my pet being killed by some nutters “pet”.

  • MrMAD says:

    “nicholas scatuorchio
    rottinick@yahoo.com
    70.209.4.139
    Submitted on 2014/05/15 at 6:13 am

    Still here POS. NOT GOING ANYWHERE.”

    Yes, you are.

    You’re gone, for good, bye. Banned.


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